Northsiders heading to polls for mid-term elections

By ANTHONY WARREN,

Two highly contested Senate races, as well as numerous judicial races will be on the ballot on Tuesday, November 6.

Northsiders are expected to head to the polls in the next two weeks to vote in the 2018 election.

Traditionally, mid-term election turnout is down, but with two highly competitive U.S. Senate seats up for grabs, more residents could turn out.

Senate incumbent Roger Wicker, a Republican, is seeking a second full term. He is being challenged by state Rep. David Baria, a Democrat; Libertarian candidate Danny Bedwell; and Reform Party candidate Shawn O’Hara.

Four candidates are also seeking to fill the remainder of Sen. Thad Cochran’s term. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith, who was appointed by Gov. Phil Bryant, will face off against  Mike Espy, former secretary of agriculture and a former U.S. representative; state Sen. Chris McDaniel; and Tobey Bernard Bartee, a former U.S. Navy intelligence officer and intelligence analyst for U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Because this race is a special election, the race is nonpartisan.

In Hinds County, Northsiders will also vote in the District Two and District Three congressional races, as well as Mississippi Court of Appeals District Four, Position Two, Hinds County Circuit Court District Seven, Place One, and County Court Judge District One.

The District Two congressional race features longtime incumbent Rep. Bennie Thompson, who is being challenged by Reform candidate Irving Harris and Republican Troy Ray. The District Three race features Madison-Rankin District Attorney Michael Guest, a Republican, who will face Democrat Michael Ted Evans and Reform candidate Matthew Holland.

 

The court of appeals race pits current Hinds County Circuit Judge Jeff Weill against attorney and Mississippi College adjunct professor David McCarty and Byron Carter, an attorney and shareholder with the Carter Law Firm.

The Hinds County District Seven, Place One Circuit Court race is between Matt Allen, an attorney with the Brunini Law Firm; Bruce Burton, owner of Burton Law Firm; Pat McNamara, Hinds County assistant district attorney; former State Rep. Adrienne Wooten; and Bill Walker, an attorney in private practice.

County Court District One will feature Greta Mack Harris, Bridgette Marie Morgan and incumbent Judge Melvin Priester; and Chancery Judge Dewayne Thomas is running unopposed for another term as District 5, Place One judge.

 

In Madison County, residents will also vote in the District Two and District Three Congressional races, state and county judicial races and school board races.

For Court of Appeals District Two, Position One, county residents will choose between Eric Charles Hawkins, Ceola James and Deborah McDonald.

And for the Madison County Circuit Court 20, Place Three, voters will choose between Dewey Arthur, Dan Jones, Bruce McKinley and Andy Stewart. The winner will replace incumbent Judge William Chapman, who is retiring.

Other county races are unopposed, including District 20, Place One Circuit Judge John Emfinger, District 20, Place Two Circuit Judge Steve Ratcliff, Place One County Judge Staci O’Neal, Place Two County Judge Ed Hannan and District 11-2 Chancery Judge Cynthia Lee Brewer.

Sam Kelly and Philip Huskey are also running unopposed for positions on the school board. Huskey, the incumbent, currently represents District Four, while Kelly represents District Three.

Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann is urging all Mississippi voters to cast their ballots.

“The only way your vote doesn’t get counted is if you don’t cast it,” he said. Hosemann recently spent a week in Kuwait, where he helped train the Mississippi Army National Guard’s 155th Armored Brigade Team how to cast ballots electronically.

“That’s all Mississippi people, in a desert just south of the Iraqi border,” he said. “They’re over there for an entire year. They left in June, some in May. They are there to protect your right to cast a ballot.

“If any Mississippi voter had been with me and watched what these men and women (were) doing for our state and country, they wouldn’t miss voting in November.”

Social

St. Richard’s Halloween parties were full of treats.