Sexual assaults against females are an epidemic

By NIKKI ROWELL,

In light of the recent allegations against Judge Brett Kavanaugh as he seeks confirmation to the Supreme Court, many are asking, “Why come forward now?”

I’m sorry, when you’re sexually assaulted, they don’t give out a guide on the correct timeframe to come forward.

Did you know that only 310 out of every 1,000 sexual assaults are reported to the police? According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), that means roughly two out of three cases go unreported.

Did you know only 20 percent of college-age female students report sexual assault?

Do you want to know why? Just look at how people are reacting to the victim’s claims against Kavanaugh. The assault is downplayed and called “politically motivated.”

Just check out the #WhyIDidntReport hashtag on Twitter. There you will find hundreds of cases of the consequences women faced when they were brave enough to report their abuser.

Of sexual violence crimes not reported to police from 2005 to 2010, victims cited feared retaliation and the belief that the police would not do anything to help as reasons why they did not originally come forward.

And why not?

Did you know that out of every 1,000 rapes, 994 perpetrators will walk free?

And when three women (as of press time) decide to come forward about a person, who could potentially hold a life term on the highest court in our country, they are automatically thought to be liars.

The recent allegations against Kavanaugh for sexual assault have also been met with another question, “If as a drunken 17-year-old who made aggressive but ultimately unsuccessful sexual advances against someone, should that disqualify him from the nation’s highest bench?”

My answer? YES.

A man who clearly does not respect women should not hold a position with that much power to affect the daily lives of women.

Also, if he did it, a man like that who makes “mistakes” of that magnitude should not hold a life term on our highest court.

Interesting that so many believe a 17-year-old shouldn’t be held accountable because “boys will be boys.” However, a 15-year-old girl is expected to be strong and mature enough to report him immediately. 

Nikki Rowell is a staff writer for the Northside Sun.